Flannel Scarf

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I found a tutorial explaining how to make a single loop infinity scarf but I wanted a two loop infinity scarf and what I ended up with was a four loop infinity scarf. I am going to explain how to make a two loop infinity scarf which should be pretty easy and quick and then I am going to show and explain what I did. As an inexperienced seamstress I learned a few lessons during this project. 1. Once you cut the fabric you just have to go with it. 2. I need better scissors. 3. How to correctly thread a bobbin on my sewing machine. 4. Zigzag stitches use a lot of thread, and 5. There aren’t as many choices of plaid flannel shirting as you may think. If you prefer the look of a one loop infinity scarf, check out this tutorial: 10 Minute DIY Infinity Scarf Tutorial .

Materials and Equipment:

  • Sewing machine (or I guess you could hand stitch if you are really patient)
  • Sharp scissors
  • 1 yard of flannel shirting fabric
  • Matching thread
  • Straight pins
  • Measuring tape


Two Loop Flannel Infinity Scarf
One yard of fabric will not wrap twice around your neck so you are going to have to cut it in half, try to match up the pattern as best as you can, and sew the two halves together so you have one long piece (72 inches). The way the fabric lays, you may even need to trim some of the width of each piece off a bit so your scarf isn’t so wide that it lays weird around your neck. This is all about your preference so you need to hold the two pieces together and wrap it around your neck to see how it looks and determine if you need to make any adjustments to the length or the width.

  1. Spread your fabric out flat and cut it in half creating two pieces of fabric that are each 36 inches long. I cut it along one of the pattern lines which made it easy to aline the pattern of both pieces together. You will need to trim the width of the two pieces so that it isn’t too wide and so the pattern lines up correctly. Remember that you will be using about an inch to combine these two pieces so take that into account when you are determining how much length you should trim off. Since you only have the bulk of two loops I recommend not making your scarf too narrow because it make looks like two dinky shreds of fabric around your neck.
  2. Take one piece and do a zigzag stitch or serge stitch around the whole outside. Take the other piece and do the same. The zigzag stitch will help to prevent fraying for the most part depending how close you get to the edge but I suggest using a serge stitch because it seems to really prevent any fraying and secures the edges of the fabric well.
  3. Now line up the two pieces of fabric creating a 72 inch (or whatever your total was after you trimmed your pieces) piece. The fabric I used didn’t have a good side and a bad side, they both looked the same so I just lined up the pattern putting two ends back to back and pining them together (about an inch).
  4. Sew the two ends together using a zigzag stitch. It will create a small fold in your scarf.
  5. Do the same thing to the two remaining ends making sure your next fold in your scarf faces the same way (so your scarf has an inside and outside and your stitches and binding is only seen on the inside).

Well, that was easy, wish I had done that. But I did this…

Four Loop Flannel Infinity Scarf
This became a four loop scarf because I cut my fabric the wrong way. The weight of the fabric makes the width of your loops important. They need to be wide. I started cutting making the piece too narrow which meant to I had to add length in order to insure the same bulk and look as a wider two loop scarf. The scarf is really long and once it is on it looks great but I recommend learning from my mistakes and make the double loop. Some of these pictures do apply to the two loop version and can be used a visual guides.

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Step 1: Spread your fabric out flat.

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Step 2: Fold both end of fabric over, meeting in the middle evenly. You will be cutting the fabric 3 times to make 4 equal pieces of fabric.

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Step 3: Using the lines of the fabric as a guide cut the fabric into 4 pieces starting with the two pieces folded over (cut at the fold) and then down the middle of the remaining piece. I followed the pattern on the fabric to insure I cut along the same line on each piece making me only have to trim one piece to match the other three. Go ahead and pin these pieces together to get an idea if you need to cut any length off. I didn’t cut any length off because I wanted the scarf to be bulky once it was wrapped around my neck.

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Step 4: Take one piece of fabric and do a zigzag stitch or serge stitch around the whole outside. Take the other pieces and do the same. The zigzag stitch will help to prevent fraying for the most part depending how close you get to the edge but I suggest using a serge stitch because it seems to really prevent any fraying and secures the edges of the fabric well.

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Step 5: Now line up the four pieces of fabric creating one long line.

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Step 6: The fabric I used didn’t have a good side and a bad side, they both looked the same so I just lined up the pattern putting two ends back to back and pining them together (about an inch).
Sew the two ends together using a zigzag stitch. It will create a small fold in your scarf. Do the same thing to the other ends making sure your next fold in your scarf faces the same way (so your scarf has an inside and outside and your stitches and binding is only seen on the inside). In this case I had 3 folds not counting the final loop connection.

Step 7: Sew the remaining two ends together making a huge loop. Get ready to wrap. It looks great once it is wrapped but it looks pretty silly when it isn’t. That is why suggest just making the two loop.

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